Events

Parts Known & Unknown: Exploring the Borders of Truth, Reconciliation and Redress

Every Child Matters


Parts Known & Unknown:  Exploring the Borders of Truth, Reconciliation and Redress

W. Kamau Bell joined Anthony Bourdain in Kenya in what was to be the final season of the CNN series, Parts Unknown. Kamau has roots in Kenya and this was his first time travelling to the motherlands of his people, and he stated something that I thought was interesting. He said something like, “coming to Kenya, you know, it’s nice to have a diasporic-kind-of-connection, even though I did not come from Kenya, but I have roots in Kenya, and even if that frame that the connection was built through was colonialism.”

It made me think about what it would be like for someone like myself to travel to the ancestral homes of my people. Well, this is my home. Certainly, more than it is your home, and in this era of truth and reconciliation, it is now both my home as much as it is your home. I come from no other place in the world than from right here, diitiidʔaaʔtx̣ – Ditidaht, we are the Nuuchahnulth and the seas for miles of shoreline and all of the land on the western side of our Vancouver Island home, from Point No Point in the south to Brooks Peninsula in the north, is Nuuchahnulth territory, our haahuulthii.

In the conclusion of that episode with W. Kamau Bell in Parts Unknown, Tony narrates an epilogue, “Who gets to tell the stories? This is a question asked often. The answer in this case, for better or for worse, is I do, at least this time out. I do my best, I look, I listen, but in the end, I know it’s my story. Not Kamau’s, not Kenya’s, or Kenyans’. Those stories are yet to be heard.”

It’s important for colonial settlers, and for new settlers, to Canada to consider who you are and where you come from, and what it means to live in British Columbia, and to think about your own frame of reference as being truly Canadian, even if that frame that the connection was built through was colonialism. The context, the narrative, the history, the good or bad of it, the story of what it means to be Canadian is apart and a part of your individual and shared story as a British Columbian, as a Canadian, as an unwelcomed or welcomed colonial settler, and as a new settler. The stories that have yet to be heard, and are now starting in some ways to be told, is our story, my story, of what it means to be diitiidʔaaʔtx̣, to be Nuuchahnulth, to be First Nations, to be Indigenous, and to also be Canadian in this country and in this province.

The National Day for Truth and Reconciliation is a unique opportunity to bridge the divide of our individual and collective stories, our distinct and shared experiences, and our united effort to right and write a new history chaptered with the stories of a sincere determination to tell the truths of the past, to reaffirm and renew our commitments to reconcile all things oppressive, racist and insufferable, and to create an honest and just redress for all Indigenous – First Nations, Inuit, Métis – peoples. It would be momentous to proclaim someday that we all come from a country in which the frame that the connection was built through was equality, acceptance and compassion.

It’s fair to ask, “What will you do between October 1st, 2022 and September 29th, 2023, to recognize your part in this history, this story, and what will you actively do to shift the narrative?” We’re at an urgent time in our country’s history to thoughtfully and actively explore all parts known and unknown in our ongoing journey to come to terms with each other and with our past, and with the present day. I look forward to the work ahead this year, and I’ll look forward to us hearing each other’s stories next year and in the many years to come.

With Respect,

Derek Thompson – Thlaapkiituup
Indigenous Initiatives Advisor, Office of Respectful Environments, Equity, Diversity & Inclusion


Continue Learning

“The time to make things happen is now. The time to seek out our individual and shared power is now.”

Read the Message from the Indigenous Initiatives Advisor, Derek Thompson – Thlaapkiituuphere

Discover REDI’s Indigenous-Specific Resources here

Welcome to REDI

Indigenous Intelligence Training with Maynard Angus

REDI’s Indigenous Musicians List

Photos of Indigenous Musicians from the website of the movie “RUMBLE: The Indians Who Rocked the World.”

June 21st marks National Indigenous Peoples Day in Canada, a time to “recognize and celebrate the history, heritage, resilience, and diversity of First Nations, Inuit, and Métis communities across Canada” (Government of Canada). In honour of this day, we are thrilled to share a curated list of our favourite Indigenous musicians. We encourage you to listen to their music and participate in local June 21st festivities throughout British Columbia. By attending these events, we honour the profound contributions of Indigenous peoples to our national tapestry and foster a deeper understanding and appreciation of their enduring legacy.



Interested in learning more? We highly recommend watching the movie “RUMBLE: The Indians Who Rocked the World“, which tells the story of Indigenous influence on the history of American music.

Pride

Learn and celebrate with us during this Pride season. Continue reading “Pride”

Beyond Diversity: Embedding a Culture of Inclusive Excellence in Medicine

The UBC Faculty of Medicine (FoM) Office of Respectful Environments, Equity, Diversity and Inclusion (REDI) is pleased to invite you to join our 3rd virtual Annual Symposium titled: “Beyond Diversity: Embedding a Culture of Inclusive Excellence in Medicine.”

Image of mountain peaks under a starry sky.

The symposium will be held virtually on Wednesday, June 5th, 2024 from 12:00 PM to 3:15 PM.


Program

  • 12:00-12:10 — Opening Remarks: What is Inclusive Excellence? by Dr. Maï Yasué
  • 12:10-12:20 — Inclusive Excellence & Indigenization, Decolonization, and Reconciliation, with Derek Thompson – Thlaapkiituup & Dr. Maï Yasué
  • 12:20-2:00 — Panel 1 | Embedding Inclusive Excellence in Clinical and Curricular Environments, with Dr. Adam Neufeld, Dr. Allison Brown, Dr. Heather Buckley, Dr. Niresha Velmurugiah, & Dr. Wiley Chung, moderated by Dr. Maï Yasué & Dr. Saleem Razack
  • 2:00-3:00 — Panel 2 | Weaving Inclusive Excellence into the Undergraduate Admissions Process, with Dr. Peggy DeJong, Catherine Macala & Dr. Wiley Chung, moderated by Dr. Maï Yasué & Dr. Saleem Razack
  • 3:00-3:15 — Closing remarks

Speaker Bios

Maï Yasué

Opening Session Lead & Co-moderator

Dr. Maï Yasué (She/Her), Associate Director, REDI

Dr. Maï is the Associate Director of the Office of Respectful Environments, Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion (REDI) in the Faculty of Medicine. She provides leadership to the REDI team in the development and delivery of our education and training programming. She collaborates with leaders in departments, centres, and administration units, and staff, and faculty to identify institutional and individual barriers to inclusion and to foster long-term socio-cultural change towards justice, equity, decolonization, indigenization, and inclusion (JEDII). Previously, she worked at the Equity & Inclusion Office at UBC, where she led initiatives such as the JEDII STEM Series and the IBPOC STEM Network and supported the integration of the JEDII principles into teaching, research, and faculty and staff recruitment. Prior to her work at UBC, she was a faculty member at Quest University Canada for over a decade, teaching interdisciplinary courses in conservation and geography and advocating for transparency, equity, and inclusion through various leadership roles.

Maï, a second-generation immigrant from Japan, holds an MSc in Zoology from the University of Oxford and a PhD in Geography from the University of Victoria. As an interdisciplinary scholar, she has published over 40 articles in academic fields such as conservation, geography, zoology, education, behavioral ecology, economics, and psychology. She is grateful for having spent most of her life on the traditional, ancestral, and unceded territories of the xʷməθkʷəy̓əm (Musqueam), Sḵwx̱wú7mesh Úxwumixw (Squamish), səlilwətaɬ (Tsleil-Waututh), and Stó:lō Nations.

Derek Thompson

Opening Session Lead

Derek Thompson- Thlaapkiituup (He/Him),
Director, Indigenous Engagement, Faculty of Medicine

Derek Thompson – Thlaapkiituup is from the Ditidaht First Nation, one of 14 Nuuchahnulth communities along the west coast of Vancouver Island. The seas for miles of shoreline and all of the land on the western side of our Vancouver Island home, from Point No Point in the south to Brooks Peninsula in the north, is Nuuchahnulth territory – our haahuulthii.

Derek is the Director, Indigenous Engagement for the UBC Faculty of Medicine, and in 2021 he was the first Indigenous Advisor in the Office of Respectful Environments, Equity, Diversity & Inclusion. Thlaapkiituup brings over 30 years of experience working with First Nations organizations and communities across the province and country to achieve wellness through health and related services.

His mission is to foster trust and mutual respect amongst students, staff and faculty in an effort to create an understanding of the commitments made by the Faculty of Medicine to redress and strengthen the relationship with Indigenous peoples and communities.

Saleem Razack (He/Him)

Co-moderator

Dr. Saleem Razack (He/Him), Senior Faculty Advisor, REDI

Dr. Razack is a Senior Faculty Advisor in the Office of Respectful Environments, Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion (REDI) in the Faculty of Medicine. In his role, Dr. Razack advises on strategy related to the implementation of a comprehensive anti-racism plan for the Faculty. He aims to serve in and contribute to the vibrant and diverse community within the Faculty of Medicine and its associated clinical and research sites.

Dr Razack joined faculty at UBC/BC Children’s Hospital on January 1, 2023, after a 25-year career as a pediatric intensivist and medical educator/education researcher at McGill University. He is a graduate of the University of Toronto. His research Interests in Medical Education include the intersection of assessment and professionalism with representation, equity, diversity, inclusion and anti-racism, for which he has had SSHRC and CIHR support. He is the recipient of the AFMC May Cohen award for outstanding contributions to equity in medical education, the Haile T. Debas award for contributions to equity in the Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences at McGill, and the Pediatric Chairs of Canada award for outstanding contribution to Medical Education.


Panelists

Dr. Adam Neufeld

Dr. Adam Neufeld

Dr. Adam Neufeld, MSc, MD, CCFP, is a family physician who practices full time in the Calgary community. He is also a clinical lecturer at the University of Calgary, a medical teacher, and a researcher, with a special interest in applying Self-Determination Theory (SDT) in medical education to improve physician and trainee well-being. He is married, has two boys aged 2 and 5, and in what spare time he has, he enjoys snowboarding, playing soccer, and fly fishing.


Dr. Allison Brown

Dr. Allison Brown

Dr. Allison Brown, PhD, is an Assistant Professor in the Departments of Medicine and Community Health Sciences at the Cumming School of Medicine, University of Calgary. Dr. Brown is an applied social scientist whose mixed-methods research program aims to be responsive to emerging societal needs by re-imagining how medical schools can better train current and future medical doctors to serve diverse and dynamic societies. She applies critical theories and methods to uncover the structural barriers in professional and institutional contexts that act as barriers to social accountability, and ultimately, to social justice.


Catherine Macala

Catherine Macala is the Associate Director, MD Admissions at the University of British Columbia. She has a Master of Arts Degree in Higher Education, with a special focus on equity, diversity and inclusion measures related to student selection and student progression through post-secondary education. She is deeply interested in how explicit and implicit values impact the creation of evaluation measures, policies, and outcomes, including how they impact applicants and students. Catherine is constantly learning from the colleagues, mentors, students, community members, applicants and advocates she engages with. She is so grateful to each person who is willing to share their story, experience, and insight as it continues to make a profound difference in how she views the work she is so deeply imbedded in.


Dr. Heather Buckley

Dr. Heather Buckley

Dr. Heather Buckley is a Clinical Associate Professor in the Department of Family Medicine and a scholar at the Center for Health Education Scholarship (CHES). She graduated with her medical degree from the University of British Columbia (UBC) and completed her residency in Family Medicine at Western University. Her history of involvement in the Faculty of Medicine includes 20 years as a teacher and 10 years in a leadership position on the Vancouver Fraser Medical Program (VFMP) Faculty Development team.  In 2019, Dr. Buckley completed the Clinical Educator Fellowship Program at the UBC Center for Health Education Scholarship; during that time she also completed a Masters of Health Professions Education from Maastricht University. Her research interests are always expanding but she has a special interest in the area of relationships and social networks in faculty development. 

As Associate Dean, Faculty Development, Dr. Buckley provides strategic leadership to ensure linkages exist to support an integrated province-wide faculty development program. She believes deeply in the importance of fostering positive and safe working and learning environments where support and recognition is provided for faculty and staff. She truly enjoys her work and attributes much of that to her own network of supportive, intelligent, kind, and inspiring colleagues.


Dr. Niresha Velmurugiah

Dr. Niresha Velmurugiah

Dr. Niresha Velmurugiah obtained her Doctor of Medicine and completed her residency in Emergency Medicine at the University of Alberta. She works as an Emergency Physician at Vancouver General Hospital and UBC Hospital, and as a Clinical Assistant Professor at the UBC Department of Emergency Medicine. She has a background in health disparities and experience in medical education development in the area of EDI. She currently serves as the curriculum lead for Professionalism, Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion for Undergraduate Medical Education at UBC.

Dr. Peggy DeJong

Dr. Peggy DeJong

Dr. Peggy DeJong received her Honors Bachelor of Science (Health Sciences) from the University of Waterloo and her medical degree from Queen’s University. Her clinical training in Internal Medicine and Cardiology was also at Queen’s University. She completed an additional fellowship year in Echocardiography at the University of British Columbia, Vancouver General Hospital. She joined the Division of Cardiology at Queen’s University in 2014 and is the current Medical Director for the Echo Lab at KHSC. In September 2023, she was appointed Assistant Dean of Admissions for the MD program at Queen’s University.

Dr. DeJong’s chief academic interest is medical education. She completed her Master’s in Medical Education with Distinction at the University of Dundee, Scotland, in 2022. At Queen’s University, Dr. DeJong served as the Director of the Adult Cardiology Residency Training Program from July 2015 to December 2019 and was the CBME Lead for Cardiology from 2015 to 2022. She was also the Term 4 Clinical Skills Course Director from January 2022 to June 2023. Aside from contributing to education at all levels of training, she also has a significant interest in advancing Indigenous health and incorporating Indigenous health issues into medical education. She received a medical education program grant from the Southeastern Ontario Academic Medical Organization (SEAMO) to pursue an advanced certificate for Indigenous educators in Indigegogy. This background has enhanced her abilities to address Indigenous health issues in medical education and better support Indigenous students in medicine.

*Dr. DeJong is a citizen of the Manitoba Metis Federation and the Metis Nation of Ontario.

Dr. Wiley Chung

Dr. Wiley Chung

Dr. Wiley Chung is the Director of Equity, Diversity, Inclusion, Indigeneity, and Accessibility (EDIIA) in Queen’s MD program. He is a thoracic surgeon with extensive experience in both undergraduate and postgraduate medical education (PGME).  Dr. Chung is also the Collaborator Competency Lead in the MD Program.  He is working on weaving EDIIA into collaborative learning, teaching, and practice between our MD program, the School of Nursing, and the School of Rehabilitation Therapy.  His Master of Health Professions Education has given him the expertise and skillset for his current roles.  Dr. Chung is leading the decolonization and Indigenization of the surgical curriculum in PGME.


Description

In recent years, many of the traditional metrics for assessing and evaluating “excellence” within the Faculty of Medicine have begun to change. This shift is partly in response to critiques suggesting that current methods of measuring and defining excellence prevent us from fulfilling our contract with society, impede innovation and diversity of thought, and create barriers for various historically, systemically, and persistently marginalized groups. Various commitments, including the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada’s Calls to Action and the UBC Indigenous Strategic Plan, along with the Faculty of Medicine Strategic Plan and the Strategic Equity and Anti-Racism Framework (StEAR), set the direction in which we are heading, but questions remain on how individual clinicians, leaders, staff members, and units can actually implement the necessary changes.

In this third annual symposium, we will discuss how to embed inclusive excellence into various domains of academic medicine. We will address topics including teaching, mentorship, leadership, research, and patient care. We have invited panelists and speakers who are exemplars and early adopters who have created changes in processes and practices to embed this idea of inclusive excellence into key processes such as education, mentorship, or admissions. By collectively embedding inclusive excellence into our work, we hope to transform the culture towards anti-oppression, belonging, inclusion, and the thriving of all community members.

At a time when there is significant polarization across different identity groups, we hope that this session and the framing of “inclusive excellence” will remind people of their common goals and help to unite us as we work in solidarity to build a more inclusive healthcare system.

Through short presentations and panel discussions, the key questions that we would like to explore are:

  • How do we redefine what excellence is with a lens of equity, inclusion, decolonization, and Indigenization?
  • Within this new definition of excellence, what are the characteristics of excellent curriculum, mentors, clinicians, learners, leaders, and staff?
  • How do we embed this new definition of excellence in our performance reviews, hiring, awards, admissions, and adjudication processes in a ‘fair’ way?
  • What are the challenges of redefining excellence? How do we work together and build solidarity to create change?

Executive Director Role Open: Champion Equity in Transforming Health for All

EDI Joint Interest Group

The EDI Joint Interest Group is a network for equity leads, EDI champions or any staff or faculty responsible for advancing or leading EDI initiatives in their unit, department, school or program. We meet monthly to discuss topics of interest and connect via MS teams.

Please click on the meeting titles below to learn more and register to receive the Zoom link for a particular session. You can also register to join the mailing list for all upcoming sessions.

EDI Joint Interest Group

Are you a faculty or staff member leading equity, inclusion, decolonization, and Indigenization initiatives within your unit? Would you benefit from a community of practice to discuss common challenges you face in your role? Join our monthly EDI Joint Interest Group or Drop in for a Session. Please click on the meeting titles below to learn more and register to receive the Zoom link for a particular session. You can also register to join the mailing list for all upcoming sessions.



Upcoming EDI Joint Interest Group monthly topics:

Trauma-informed practices
August 12th, 2024, Optional Lunch: 12:00-1:00 PM, Session time: 1:00-2:00 PM PST (Hybrid: In person and via Zoom)

Join us for lunch from 12-1 PM and then attend a session with Madison Tardif, Equity Advisor, REDI, on trauma informed practices. The session will also be broadcasted via Zoom for those unable to join us in person.

In person location: TBD.

Facilitating short EDI sessions for your team
July 8th, 2024, Session time: 1:00-2:00 PM, Office Hours: 2:00-2:30 PM PST (Zoom)

Maï Yasué, Associate Director, REDI, Mai will provide “train-the-trainer” support for the EDI leads within units to facilitate 5-10 minute EDI speed lessons for their units or teams. This could be suitable for the start of grand rounds, faculty, or team meetings and will help you embed EDI into your regular practices. For topic examples, refer to REDI Best Practices, REDI Grab ‘n’ Gos, and REDI Deep Dives.

Optional office hours after the session provides an opportunity to stay longer and ask questions in smaller group settings.

Tips and tricks for managing power dynamics in meetings
June 10th, 2024, Session time: 1:00-2:00 PM, Office Hours: 2:00-2:30 PM PST (Zoom)

Maï Yasué, Associate Director, REDI, will lead a session on inclusive chairing practices designed to mitigate power imbalances and enhance accessibility.

Optional office hours after the session provides an opportunity to stay longer and ask questions in smaller group settings.

Strategies to motivate members of dominant groups to action EDI
May 13th, 2024, Session time: 1:00-2:00 PM, Office Hours: 2:00-2:30 PM PST (Zoom)

Maï Yasué, Associate Director, REDI, will facilitate a discussion on strategies for fostering autonomous motivation—behaving because one truly values and identifies with the behaviour, or finds it inherently satisfying—which is crucial for inspiring lasting change. In this session, we will explore key principles that can drive behavioural change in a self-sustained manner, even without external rewards or pressure.

Optional office hours after the session provides an opportunity to stay longer and ask questions in smaller group settings.

Q&A Session
April 22nd, 2024, 1:00-2:00 PM (Zoom)

Maï Yasué, Associate Director, REDI, will facilitate an open-ended session featuring a Q&A format and small group discussions. Participants will have the opportunity to meet and exchange ideas and questions on various previously covered topics, including admissions, faculty hiring, conflict engagement, creating inclusive environments for historically marginalized groups, and tips for engaging others in EDI initiatives, as well as initiating action within EDI committees.

De-escalating intergroup conflicts
March 11th, 2024, 1:00-2:00 PM (Zoom)

Arun Mohan, Director of Human Rights at the Equity & Inclusion Office, will help answer questions about what EDI leads and unit heads can do to de-escalate intergroup conflict and provide support when there are global events and tragedies that affect the learning and work environments.

Continuing our conversation on “inclusive excellence,” how do we pursue it in our hiring and recruitment processes?
Feb 12th, 2024, 1:00-2:00 PM (Zoom)

Questions that we might address include: How can we inclusively and equitably adjudicate excellence in hiring, selections, and award decisions? What are the most important changes in procedures that we can make to foster more inclusive and equitable selection processes? How do we best frame these changes in process or criteria to avoid backlash and support historically marginalized groups?

Our special guest for this session will be Saleem Razack, who is the Senior Faculty Advisor to the REDI Office. This session is a follow-up conversation from the January 2024 meeting with Saleem Razack and the November 2023 meeting with Catherine Macala.

How do we operationalize “inclusive excellence” in all the different adjudication/selection/awards decisions that we make?
Jan 8th, 2024, 1:00-2:00 PM (Zoom)

Questions that we might address include: If grades, volunteering experiences, journal impact factors, and student evaluations of teaching are sexist/ableist/racist, etc., then how do we inclusively and equitably adjudicate excellence in hiring, selections, and award decisions? What are the most important changes in procedures that we can make to have more inclusive and equitable selection processes? How do we best frame these changes in process or criteria to avoid backlash and support historically marginalized groups?

Our special guest for this session will be Saleem Razack, who is the Senior Faculty Advisor to the REDI Office and has extensive experience working within medical school admissions processes. This session is a follow-up conversation from the meeting in November 2023 that Catherine Macala (Associate Director MD Undergraduate Admissions) led about equity and inclusion considerations in the undergraduate admissions process.

How do we create supports for historically marginalized learners to thrive within the Faculty of Medicine?
Dec 11th, 2023, 1:00-2:00 PM (Zoom)

In this session, we aim to discuss various initiatives within units in the FoM designed to support historically, persistently, and systemically marginalized groups. Specifically, Tal Jarus will talk about the mentorship program for learners with disabilities within Occupational Science and Therapy, as well as the Diversifying Health and Human Service Professions Education – D-HOPE Program. This program aims to support historically marginalized students in applying for Health Professions at UBC by providing resources and creating opportunities for mentorship and connection.

Inclusive Excellence & Students – Admissions, Student Awards
Nov, 2023 (Zoom)

“Broadening the Tent” – Inspiring others to get involved, getting buy-in from the broader unit
Oct, 2023 (Zoom)

REDI Best Practices: Designing a Faculty In-Person Interview Experience for Success

Intergroup dialogue

Intergroup dialogue

Intergroup dialogue is a face-to-face, structured, and facilitated group experience that creates opportunities for participants to listen deeply, engage in self-reflection, and gain new perspectives on polarizing societal issues. Dialogues have helped to build relationships between conflicting groups, reduce polarization, promote increased self-awareness about biases, and strengthen diverse groups’ abilities to work together towards common goals. Intergroup dialogue draws on different fields such as social psychology (in particular Gordon Allport’s ‘intergroup contact hypothesis’), John Dewey’s democratic education, and Paulo Freire’s ideas on dialogic pedagogy to promote transformative learning.

The REDI Office is looking to connect with individuals interested in learning more about intergroup dialogue or participating in one. Register your interest and indicate the topics you would like to explore in an intergroup dialogue in this survey.

References

Additional Resources

  • Watch an incredible example of intergroup dialogue in action in a recent TED talk here.
  • The Executive Director of the WOSK Center for Dialogue and former Director of the Equity & Inclusion Office writes about facilitating intergroup dialogue here.
  • Learn more about intergroup dialogue in this book “Facilitating Intergroup DialoguesBridging Differences, Catalyzing Change.”
  • William Ury, the co-founder of the Harvard Program on Negotiation, recently published a book titled “Possible: How We Can Survive (and Thrive) in an Age of Conflict,” which also includes examples from intergroup dialogue.
  • Learn more about UBC’s Conflict Engagement Initiative here.

Coming Home: Honouring the Resiliency of All Survivors of the Indian Residential School Experience

Join our first hybrid Indigenous Speakers Series session on Wednesday, September 25th, 2024 from 9:00 AM – 4:00 PM (PST). In this unique session, we are honoured to welcome back Survivors of the Indian Residential School Experience, who joined us in September 2022, and the children of Survivors, who participated in September 2023. Both generations are courageous Survivors of the continuing legacy of this horrific chapter in Canada’s history.

You’re invited to join us in person or via live stream for this transformative conversation between generations of Survivors of the Indian Residential School Experience and to bear witness to how we, as First Nations, understand this important work within the context of our culture, our ceremonies, our spiritual work, and the way that we do things in our communities. You are invited to be a part of our efforts to heal, to come together, to work with each other, and to anchor our commitments to do and be better.

Coming Home: Honouring the Resiliency of All Survivors of the Indian Residential School Experience

Join us in person on Wednesday, September 25th, 2024 from 9:00 AM – 4:00 PM (PST), for “Coming Home: Honouring the Resiliency of All Survivors of the Indian Residential School Experience.” The event will also be live streamed.

Given the importance and sensitivity of the event, we kindly request that those attending in-person commit to participating throughout the entire day. 

Breakfast and lunch will be served by Sage catering during the event.


Moderator

Derek Thompson

Derek K Thompson – Thlaapkiituup, Director, Indigenous Engagement


Description 

The connection between a parent and child is equally sacred and unknown, loving and mysterious, and wondrous and filled with anxiety. Imagine the bond between Survivors of the Indian Residential School Experience and the children of Survivors—both generations are courageous Survivors of the continuing legacy of this horrific chapter in Canada’s history. Survivors and their children continue to work, to heal, to come to terms, and to embrace the adversity in an effort to bring about transformative change in the way we understand, reconcile, and begin anew the resiliency of love and forgiveness for and with each other.

I was honoured to welcome each generation in September 2023 and in September 2022, and I am humbled to welcome both panels back on Wednesday, September 25th, 2024, for a unique, transformative, and once-in-a-lifetime experience to bridge the conversation between generations of Survivors of the Indian Residential School Experience in Canada and British Columbia.

You are invited to bear witness to how we, as First Nations, understand this important work within the context of our culture, our ceremonies, our spiritual work, and the way that we do things in our communities. You are invited to be a part of our efforts to heal, to come together, to work with each other, and to anchor our commitments to do and be better. You are invited to experience the unique features of our culture, our identity, and our sensibilities about this important work. You are all invited to be a part of telling the truth, of reckoning with the truth, and reconciling for the present and for the future.


Topic: Coming Home: Honouring the Resiliency of All Survivors of the Indian Residential School Experience

Date: Wednesday, September 25th, 2024

Time: 9:00 AM – 4:00 PM (PST)

In person location: The University Centre, 6331 Crescent Road, Vancouver 

Live Stream | Register to receive the webcast link  

Catering: Breakfast and lunch will be served by Sage catering during the event.


What Will I Learn?

You will learn about the context of truth, reconciliation, and redress from Survivors and intergenerational Survivors of the Indian Residential School Experience in Canada.


Continue Learning

“The time to make things happen is now. The time to seek out our individual and shared power is now.”

Learn more about REDI’s Indigenous Initiatives here

Discover more about REDI’s Indigenous Initiatives Speakers Series here

Find REDI’s Indigenous-Specific Resources here

Inuit Tapiriit Kanatami: The National Voice of All Inuit in Canada

Join us on Wednesday, May 15th, 2024 from 12:00 pm – 1:30 pm (PST), for “Inuit Tapiriit Kanatami: The National Voice of All Inuit in Canada.” In this Indigenous Speakers Series session, we will have a conversation with Natan Obed, Canada’s National Inuit Leader. Natan Obed is the president of Inuit Tapiriit Kanatami, the national representational organization protecting and advancing the rights and interests of Inuit in Canada. The organization represents 65,000 Inuit, most of whom live in communities spread across Inuit Nunangat. In this conversation, we will explore the implications of truth, reconciliation and redress amongst the Inuit.

Inuit Tapiriit Kanatami: The National Voice of All Inuit in Canada

Join us virtually on Wednesday, May 15th, 2024 from 12:00 pm – 1:30 pm (PST), for “Inuit Tapiriit Kanatami: The National Voice of All Inuit in Canada.” This virtual event is presented by the Indigenous Speakers Series


Speaker Bio

Natan Obed

Natan Obed,
BA – Tufts Univ.;
H/Ph.D. LL.D. – Queen’s Univ. & Univ. of Northern BC;
President, Inuit Tapiriit Kanatami;
Founder, Inuit-Crown Partnership Committee

Natan Obed is serving his third term as President of Inuit Tapiriit Kanatami, the national organization working to ensure that Inuit in Canada prosper through unity and self-determination. He is originally from Nain, Nunatsiavut, and currently lives in Ottawa. A skilled negotiator and consensus builder, Obed is the architect of the Inuit Crown Partnership Committee, a collaborative leadership table devoted to addressing the most urgent policy challenges facing Inuit, as well as creating conditions for Inuit to thrive.

He has devoted his career to working on behalf of Inuit. Working with Inuit Treaty Organizations, he led the development and implementation of national strategies intended to bring about transformational change in the areas of suicide prevention, research, food security and climate change, and is now forging a path to build an Inuit Nunangat University. He is a graduate of Tufts University, holds honorary degrees from Queen’s University and the University of Northern British Columbia, and is the father of Panigusiq and Jushua Obed, his two teenage sons.


Moderator

Derek Thompson

Derek K Thompson – Thlaapkiituup, Director, Indigenous Engagement


Description 

Written by Derek K Thompson – Thlaapkiituup

The term pan-Indigenous is a philosophical and political approach intended to enable a cultural homogenization of First Nations, Inuit and Métis peoples in Canada regardless of ancestral distinctions and cultural differences. This approach sometimes limits our ability to really understand and appreciate the unique features and richness that uniquely define First Nations, Inuit and Métis cultures and peoples. What do we know about First Nations in BC, and across Canada? About Métis peoples? And, particularly, what do we know about Inuit peoples?

The majority of Inuit live in 51 communities spread across the Inuvialuit Settlement Region (Northwest Territories), Nunavut, Nunavik (Northern Quebec), and Nunatsiavut (Northern Labrador). This vast region is called Inuit Nunangat, and it encompasses 40% of Canada’s land area and 72% of its coastline. The existence of Inuit in the north dates back to over 5,000 years, with some as far back as 8,500 years, linking ancestral connections to place and belonging between ancient first peoples and contemporary Inuit people.

The Inuit Tapiriit Kanatami is the national representational organization protecting and advancing the rights and interests of Inuit in Canada. The organization represents 65,000 Inuit, most of whom live in communities spread across Inuit Nunangat, and it is led by President Natan Obed, Canada’s National Inuit Leader. Please join me for this important conversation with President Obed as we explore the implications of truth, reconciliation and redress amongst the Inuit.


Topic: Inuit Tapiriit Kanatami: The National Voice of All Inuit in Canada

Date: Wednesday, May 15th, 2024

Time: 12:00 – 1:30 pm (PST)


What Will I Learn?

You will learn about a unique Inuit perspective in regards to the processes of truth and reconciliation.


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