Events

Parts Known & Unknown: Exploring the Borders of Truth, Reconciliation and Redress

Every Child Matters


Parts Known & Unknown:  Exploring the Borders of Truth, Reconciliation and Redress

W. Kamau Bell joined Anthony Bourdain in Kenya in what was to be the final season of the CNN series, Parts Unknown. Kamau has roots in Kenya and this was his first time travelling to the motherlands of his people, and he stated something that I thought was interesting. He said something like, “coming to Kenya, you know, it’s nice to have a diasporic-kind-of-connection, even though I did not come from Kenya, but I have roots in Kenya, and even if that frame that the connection was built through was colonialism.”

It made me think about what it would be like for someone like myself to travel to the ancestral homes of my people. Well, this is my home. Certainly, more than it is your home, and in this era of truth and reconciliation, it is now both my home as much as it is your home. I come from no other place in the world than from right here, diitiidʔaaʔtx̣ – Ditidaht, we are the Nuuchahnulth and the seas for miles of shoreline and all of the land on the western side of our Vancouver Island home, from Point No Point in the south to Brooks Peninsula in the north, is Nuuchahnulth territory, our haahuulthii.

In the conclusion of that episode with W. Kamau Bell in Parts Unknown, Tony narrates an epilogue, “Who gets to tell the stories? This is a question asked often. The answer in this case, for better or for worse, is I do, at least this time out. I do my best, I look, I listen, but in the end, I know it’s my story. Not Kamau’s, not Kenya’s, or Kenyans’. Those stories are yet to be heard.”

It’s important for colonial settlers, and for new settlers, to Canada to consider who you are and where you come from, and what it means to live in British Columbia, and to think about your own frame of reference as being truly Canadian, even if that frame that the connection was built through was colonialism. The context, the narrative, the history, the good or bad of it, the story of what it means to be Canadian is apart and a part of your individual and shared story as a British Columbian, as a Canadian, as an unwelcomed or welcomed colonial settler, and as a new settler. The stories that have yet to be heard, and are now starting in some ways to be told, is our story, my story, of what it means to be diitiidʔaaʔtx̣, to be Nuuchahnulth, to be First Nations, to be Indigenous, and to also be Canadian in this country and in this province.

The National Day for Truth and Reconciliation is a unique opportunity to bridge the divide of our individual and collective stories, our distinct and shared experiences, and our united effort to right and write a new history chaptered with the stories of a sincere determination to tell the truths of the past, to reaffirm and renew our commitments to reconcile all things oppressive, racist and insufferable, and to create an honest and just redress for all Indigenous – First Nations, Inuit, Métis – peoples. It would be momentous to proclaim someday that we all come from a country in which the frame that the connection was built through was equality, acceptance and compassion.

It’s fair to ask, “What will you do between October 1st, 2022 and September 29th, 2023, to recognize your part in this history, this story, and what will you actively do to shift the narrative?” We’re at an urgent time in our country’s history to thoughtfully and actively explore all parts known and unknown in our ongoing journey to come to terms with each other and with our past, and with the present day. I look forward to the work ahead this year, and I’ll look forward to us hearing each other’s stories next year and in the many years to come.

With Respect,

Derek Thompson – Thlaapkiituup
Indigenous Initiatives Advisor, Office of Respectful Environments, Equity, Diversity & Inclusion


Continue Learning

“The time to make things happen is now. The time to seek out our individual and shared power is now.”

Read the Message from the Indigenous Initiatives Advisor, Derek Thompson – Thlaapkiituuphere

Discover REDI’s Indigenous-Specific Resources here

Welcome to REDI

EDI champions and Allies Series: A Conversation with Dr. Tal Jarus

Meet a UBC faculty who is creating an impact

EDI champions and Allies Series: A Conversation with Dr. Tal Jarus

In this edition of the EDI champions and Allies, meet with Dr. Tal Jarus, Chair of the Occupational Science and Occupational Therapy Department’s Justice, Equity, Diversity and Inclusion Committee (JEDI)

Dr. Tal Jarus was born and raised in Israel where she established a career as an Occupational Therapist and Professorat Tel Aviv University. She immigrated to Canada in 2006. In the past 12 years, Dr. Jarus has focused on justice within the health professions, specially advocating for diversifying the health professions and mitigating barriers for students who identify as belonging to equity-denied groups when navigating the learning and working environment.


What motivates you to engage in JEDI work?

“When I came out of the closet, having first-hand experience of being marginalized impacted me significantly. It was shocking to realize that before coming out of the closet, a lot of these injustices were not clear to me. I wasn’t even aware of my privileges until some of my privileges were taken away. I did not know what it was to feel marginalized.”Dr. Jarus mentions that the lived experience with discrimination opened her eyes to the many ways in which systemic oppression harms people, “when I see that someone’s rights are being denied, I cannot ignore it; I must take action.So, with those realizations, I became very engaged in justice work. Interestingly, my social activism never infiltrated my professional work up until 15 years ago, while I was in a leadership role and realized the systemic inequities in higher education.”


What are the challenges to JEDI work?

Some of the most significant barriers to this work are systemic issues. “The way our educational and practice systems are structured benefit mostly white able-bodied males […] there is a ‘normal’ way of doing things, the ‘right’ way to study, the ‘right’ way of sharing knowledge” says Dr. Jarus. Attitudes, structures of power and biases within the system are major roadblocks for JEDI work. As long as we continue to have dominant Eurocentric perspectives in leadership, the status quo will remain, and the needed change will be minimal and/or slow. Inspired by the need to address these inequities, Dr. Jarus began to plan and implement initiatives with the goal of creating inclusive and accessible health professions educational programs. Her work in the past few years focused on three areas: 1) increasing accessibility in the health professions, 2) exploring how to decolonize the health professions, and 3) increasing the reach to equity-denied youth who are interested in health professions as a career. 

  1. Inclusive and accessible health professions educational programs

When Dr. Jarus started working at UBC as a department head, she noticed that although the number of disabled students has increased in the classroom, adequate accommodations were not established in order to provide accessible spaces for the students to thrive. Dr Jarus notes that “Occupational Therapy is the profession where you accommodate people and you advocate for inclusive society.” It was in that moment that she realized there was a gap between thediscourse and the reality. “It is not enough to focus on diversifying the health professions. We cannot put people there just to face bias and ableism because we would be setting them up to fail […] we need to walk the talk.”

Dr. Jarus shared how these realizations created some tension and emotional heaviness. “What are we doing?” was a prevalent question accompanied by feelings of frustration because as, at that time, the head of the Occupational Therapy department, it was imperative for her to lead change.  Since then, Dr. Jarus is leading local and national studies exploring the barriers to the participation of disabled students in the health professions, and developing innovative solutions and strategies to increase accessibility and sense of belonging. One innovative aspect of those projects is how the team disseminate their findings, using theatre.

Research Based Theater (RbT) – Alone in the Ring

“There was a study conducted in which we interviewed disabled students. As I was reading the interviews and quotes, it was heart breaking. I thought: I have to find an avenue to share these stories in a way that reaches both the heart and the brain. In order to create a change, if you do it from an entire theoretical perspective, it will not work.”

In 2018, Dr. Jarus partnered up with the Faculty of Education to implement a methodology that translates research to real life experiences through theater. It is a mode of inquiry and knowledge mobilization that seeks to raise awareness and inspire audiences to be agents of cultural transformation. Dr. Jarus says, “I was amazed and struck by howimpactful it was. We performed in front of thousands of people and the number of testimonials was impressive.”

Recently the team received the 2022 D2L Innovation Award in Teaching and Learning for their Ring: Innovation in Pedagogy, from the Society of Teaching and Learning in Higher Education.

To learn more, visit the Inclusive Campus – Occupational Science & Occupational Therapy website, RbT to promote social Change: Alone in the Ring

  1. Decolonizing and indigenizing the health professions educational programs

Dr. Jarus states “When I first moved to Canada, I was not aware of colonization in Canada- I left my country because I did not want to be part of the ongoing occupation, and I had no idea I moved to a colonized country.” She says that educating herself about the history of Indigenous peoples in Canada has taken her years because “you do not get information in an organized way. You get bits and pieces.”

Dr. Jarus observed that there are very few Indigenous students in the OT program and this prompted her to start working on a strategy to change this situation.

Indigenous Student Perspectives

At the first phase of this project, In 2019, Dr. Jarus spearheaded sharing circles with Indigenous students from the health and human service programs at UBC. Those circles fostered safe spaces for Indigenous students in the Health Professions to share their stories and experiences in our learning environments The results from those sharing circles were published in this article – “Barriers and Facilitators for Indigenous Students and Staff in Health and human services educational programs.”

In 2021, Dr. Jarus together with Indigenous and settler faculty and staff created spaces to hold sharing circles under the leadership of an Elder Advisory. These sharing circles fostered culturally safe spaces for Indigenous Peoples and settlers in the Health Professions to learn together and plan actions around decolonizing and Indigenizing the health and human service professions’ educational programs. Dr. Jarus says “Change needs to come from within the programand this includes non-Indigenous people of course.” The circles of learning and change were a cohort-based program with Indigenous and non-Indigenous faculty, students and staff. The objective is to foster meaningful dialogue and reflection on topics such as decolonization of the Health professions, language & history, inclusive recruitment processes, decolonization of curriculum, the most effective ways for community engagement, and the need to acknowledge and uphold other ways of knowing.

Dr. Jarus mentions that when meeting with the Elders to share with them the impact of the Circles of Learning and Change, an important instruction from the Elders was, “We want to hear the story, do not show us the graph. Tell us how people feel.” This resulted in an animated infographic video that was created together with the Elders to outlining the major learnings from these conversations, the barriers to the work, and the vision for the future in a visual way. 

Through our conversation with Dr. Jarus, it is clear that it is necessary to bring heart to this work and foster spaces for honest and vulnerable conversations where stories can be shared, heard and held in respect. It is the act of actively and deeply listening what will ultimately help us moving forward in the effort to transform our culture.

To find details and materials from this initiative visit, Latest Circles Event Resources

  • Communities of Practice

Dr. Jarus advised that the Circles of Learning and Change were enriching spaces that allowed people to learn a lot about themselves, but also revealed that we are just at a tipping point of the work that needs to be done. People felt that this was not enough and they want to see more of these conversations occurring on campus. Therefore, a Community of Practice (CoP) was initiated to allow the conversations. 

All members of the two Circles of Learning and Change cohorts joined the CoP, which was developed with the objective of giving continuity to opportunities for conversation and experience sharing. In the CoP, members exchange learnings about ongoing initiatives related to decolonizing and Indigenizing the HHS programs and provide feedback to each other. The group meets on a monthly basis and each program (e.g. nursing, pharmacy, social work, occupation therapy, etc.) is charged with facilitating one meeting. Elders always join these meetings as they are central to this work.

  1. Increasing the reach to equity-denied youth who are interested in health professions as a career– the 2022UBC Health Profession Summer Program

Dr. Jarus notes that in order to transform the healthcare system for all, it is imperative that “people in Health professions need to be representative of the population we serve. We need to have more individuals with the diverse backgrounds and lived experiences from equity-denied groups in the health professions. In order to accomplish this, we should be reaching out to potential learners while they are youths.”

To this end, 4 health programs at UBC (OSOT, PT, Dentistry and Pharmacy) held the first 2022 UBC Health Profession Summer Program – now called D’HoPE –Diversifying Health Profession Educationwhich hosted equity-denied youth from high schools and undergrad programs for one week. The students attended presentations on the different programs available in the health professions, admission processes, equity and the importance of diversity. In the fall the program continues via group and individual mentorship program.

Dr. Jarus stresses the importance of holding these sessions given that many equity-denied youth do not view these professions as options.


How can we move forward?

“I think we have to find a way to reach out to people. Getting people to hear the stories might be helpful but this is not where we end.” Dr. Jarus notes that it is crucial to have people reflect on their own privileges with a concomitant effort to hear the stories of other individuals. RbT or sharing circles can help open the hearts but we also need to keep people engaged. Creating and strengthening JEDI action networks is crucial.

It is also important to acknowledge that some people may not understand the necessity of this work; therefore, one must find an avenue to reach out to them in a way that is constructive and conducive to change. “You want to raise your concerns in a way that people can hear them.” Says Dr. Jarus. “We need strong leaders who recognize their privilege and are committed and firm in trickling down a culture of change.” Promoting justice and enacting change require ongoing commitment and readiness to experiences uncomfortable situations – “it is a marathon, not a sprint.”


What is your vision?

That the health professions education and practice go through a radical systemic change – to start with, that thehealth professions become rightly so diversified and accessible and that there will be a strong sense of belonging for people coming from equity-denied groups.” The hope is that the Health Professions will not only reflect the society we serve, but will be truly accountable for being engaged in social activism. The talk needs to be walked.

REDI Empower Hour | Parts Known and Unknown: Derek Thompson – Thlaapkiituup Talks About the Bits and Pieces of a Meaningful Conversation

Join us for the November 17th REDI Empower Hour.

REDI Empower Hour | Parts Known and Unknown: Derek Thompson - Thlaapkiituup Talks About the Bits and Pieces of a Meaningful Conversation

Parts Known and Unknown: Derek Thompson – Thlaapkiituup Talks About the Bits and Pieces of a Meaningful Conversation

Um. Let’s see. I’m writing this bit of narrative as I’m devouring a Banh Mi sandwich. It’s delicious. As I am chomping, slurping and thoroughly enjoying my meal I’m struck by the absence and impact of Anthony Bourdain. For me, and right from the start, he was like a friend that was altogether strange and familiar. And since his passing, and as much as he did in life, the meals that I enjoy these days are the meals that I enjoyed as a child. My Gran’s homemade duck soup or my Great-Grandmother’s barbeque sockeye salmon, and she would make the cedar stick herself and fasten a whole fish on it and cook over an open fire. My Mom’s fresh bread enjoyed with a bowl of beef stew made from scratch, or the egg, bacon and cheese sandwich wrapped in foil that I would demolish on the way to school on the 3-hour return trek from Nitinaht Lake to Port Alberni. This makes me think about the spaces where we all feel welcome – the kitchen table that you grew up around, your Grandmother’s home, a favorite restaurant, a community picnic, a smorgasbord, holiday meals – and it is food. Tony said, “When someone cooks for you they are saying something. They are telling you about themselves – where they come from, who they are, what makes them happy.” So, bring your favorite meal, pull up a virtual chair, and we’ll talk about the bits and pieces of a meaningful conversation, and chew on the many and layered flavors of telling the truth and reconciling for the future.

Facilitator: Derek Thompson – Thlaapkiituup, Indigenous Advisor

Date: Thursday, November 17th, 2022

Time: 5:00 – 6:00 pm PDT

Please note that the event will not be recorded


What Will I Learn?

Anthony Bourdain said, “Perhaps wisdom is realizing how small I am, and unwise, and how far I have yet to go.” So, what we’ll strive to learn about is our potential for curiosity and compassion for and with each other.


Facilitator: Derek Thompson - Thlaapkiituup, Learning Environment Advisor, Office of Respectful Environments, Equity, Diversity & Inclusion
Facilitator: Derek Thompson – Thlaapkiituup, Learning Environment Advisor, Office of Respectful Environments, Equity, Diversity & Inclusion


What is the REDI Empower Hour

The Office of Respectful Environments, Equity, Diversity & Inclusion is proud to present a new REDI Empower Hour series featuring our team of advisors: Robyn CampolDr. Neila Miled and Derek Thompson. This fresh and informative series will be spontaneous and conversational in its approach to talk about issues that are timely and relevant. These sessions will also highlight the importance of showing up to these necessary conversations with presence and persona – so bring your very best of curiosity and energy!

Each session will also provide an opportunity for the participants to engage in a Q & A or to simply to reflect on the merits of the conversations. This exciting series will be offered monthly, with each advisor presenting their own one hour session.

IBPOC Voices: A conversation with Dr. Kiran Veerapen

Join us virtually on Friday, December, 9th, 2022 from 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm (PST), for “IBPOC Voices: A Conversation with Dr. Kiran Veerapen”. Dr. Kiran Veerapen is the Assistant Dean of Faculty Development, and Clinical Associate Professor, Department of Medicine. She is committed to remaining responsive to emerging needs in undergraduate and postgraduate education in the Faculty of Medicine.

IBPOC Voices: A conversation with Dr. Kiran Veerapen

This virtual event is part of the IBPOC Voices, a new monthly series led by Dr. Neila Miled the anti-racism Advisor.

IBPOC Voices is an opportunity to meet and have a conversation with guests who identify as Indigenous, Black and people of color. This series centers IBPOC experiences and knowledge, and highlights how they navigate the different challenges and how they engage with equity, diversity and inclusion. It is also a space where guests talk about their vision of an equitable and just environment. This series is an opportunity to open spaces where we know each other more and create a sense of community because “We are fully dependent on each other for the possibility of being understood and without this understanding we are not intelligible, we do not make sense, we are not solid, visible, integrated; we are lacking. So, travelling to each other’s “worlds” would enable us to be through loving each other” (Maria Lugones)

Dr. Kiran Veerapen, Assistant Dean of Faculty Development,
Clinical Associate Professor, Department of Medicine (bio)

Dr. Veerapen trained in Rheumatology in the United Kingdom and practiced in Malaysia from 1986 to 2004. As a pioneer Rheumatologist in Malaysia, she led the field in early descriptive and epidemiological studies in the region.


In 2004, she moved to British Columbia and has been involved in Medical Education since 2006. In 2008 she completed a Master’s degree in Medical Education through the University of Dundee and in 2012, she was awarded a PhD from the Interdisciplinary Doctoral Program at the University of Victoria. Her doctoral thesis is entitled “The impact of uniprofessional medical and nursing education on the ability to work collaboratively”.


As Assistant Dean, Faculty Development, she is committed to remaining responsive to emerging needs in undergraduate and postgraduate education in the Faculty of Medicine. Her current interests are developing contextually relevant longitudinal programs for residents and teachers and innovative strategies for Inter-professional Faculty Development.

As Director of Assessment for Undergraduate Medical Education, UBC, she has led the development and implementation of Programmatic Assessment.


Moderator

  • Dr. Neila Miled – Anti-Racism Advisor

Topic: IBPOC Voices: A conversation with Dr. Kiran Veerapen

Date: Friday, December 9th, 2022

Time: 12:00 – 1:00 pm PST


What Will I Learn?

You will learn more about IBPOC experiences and knowledge, and how IBPOC navigate the different challenges and engage with equity, diversity and inclusion.

We Are All That Is Possible: Indigenous Principles and Perspectives of Disability & Belonging with Joanne Mills

Join us virtually on Wednesday, December 7th, 2022 from 12:00 pm – 1:30 pm (PST), for “We Are All That Is Possible: Indigenous Principles and Perspectives of Disability & Belonging” with Joanne Mills, Vice President of Quality Services & Indigenous Relations at Community Living British Columbia. Joanne Mills is a proud Cree woman from Ochekwi-Sipi Fisher River Cree Nation, a signatory to Treaty 5 in Manitoba. She’s been a force of change and purpose for Indigenous peoples who have for too long been marginalized and labeled as living with developmental disabilities. In this fourth session of the Indigenous Speaker Series, we will have an opportunity to better inform our sensibilities and perceptions about Indigenous peoples who are both challenged with, and gifted with, developmental disabilities.

We Are All That Is Possible: Indigenous Principles and Perspectives of Disability & Belonging with Joanne Mills

Join us virtually on Wednesday, December 7th, 2022 from 12:00 pm – 1:30 pm (PST), for “We Are All That Is Possible: Indigenous Principles and Perspectives of Disability & Belonging” with Joanne Mills. This virtual event is presented by the Indigenous Speakers Series

Joanne Mills, Vice President of Quality Services & Indigenous Relations at Community Living British Columbia (Bio)

Joanne Mills is a proud Cree woman from Ochekwi-Sipi Fisher River Cree Nation, a signatory to Treaty 5 in Manitoba. Through marriage, she is deeply connected to the Haida Gwaii, and is a member of the Ḵ’uuna Llnagaay – Skedans Raven Clan. She is a mother of three beautiful children including an adult daughter living with a disability, and is a grandmother of two.


Joanne is the Vice President of Quality Services & Indigenous Relations at Community Living British Columbia, and has singlehandedly made transformative changes in how CLBC better responds to First Nations and Indigenous communities. She has created a new Indigenous Relations Team that will help advance the goals in the CLBC Strategic Plan, and in the 2022/23 CLBC Service Plan to build trusting relationships with First Nations and Indigenous communities, and to improve the awareness of available supports and services by increasing CLBC staff understanding about First Nations and Indigenous history and culture.


Joanne believes that she is “very privileged to be chosen for this important work and I feel that my life’s journey has prepared me to support our most precious people, and I look forward to working in partnership with First Nations and Indigenous communities to build a meaningful, culturally relevant model of care, and to collaborate with the CLBC Leadership Team to bring to life our collective vision of – Lives filled with possibilities in welcoming communities.”

Moderator

  • Derek K Thompson – Thlaapkiituup, Indigenous Advisor

Description 

Who we are and where we come from is a common thread of Indigenous – First Nations, Inuit, Métis – pride and belonging in our communities. In our communities we believe that each human being has a life force, a spirit, a soul, and a singular purpose, and that we must respect the spirit in all others. When a family is blessed with the birth of a new member, we gather, we share a feast, and pass the baby around. We sing ceremonial songs to make the baby precious, and usually the newborn is given an ancestral baby name. We greet babies as though we have always known them and speak good words of encouragement to them. We make every effort to uphold and cherish all children because as we grow into adults that sense of belonging and purpose is signaling that he or she is important and precious to the family and community.


We must reflect on, and challenge, the kinds of images that come to mind when we think about people living with developmental disabilities from a western perspective and construct, which is typically deficit-based. It’s important that such reflection address how the oppression, assimilation and racism against Indigenous peoples in Canada correlates to the experiences we see today in supporting Indigenous people and families with developmental disabilities. Taking an ahistorical approach to supporting our families and communities in this context is no longer tolerable.


There is an urgent need to create a meaningful dialogue about our understanding of Indigenous people living with developmental disabilities. There is an equal urgency to figure out how to better support First Nations, Inuit and Métis individuals, families and communities with the necessary resources to ensure a confidence of independence, care and belonging for those challenged with disabilities.


Joanne Mills is the right person for the right time to reflect on the principles and perspectives of disability and belonging. She’s been a force of change and purpose for Indigenous peoples who have for too long been marginalized and labeled as living with developmental disabilities. This important and timely conversation will provide an opportunity for us to better inform our sensibilities and perceptions about Indigenous peoples who are both challenged with, and gifted with, developmental disabilities.


Topic: We Are All That Is Possible: Indigenous Principles and Perspectives of Disability & Belonging with Joanne Mills

Date: Wednesday, December 7th, 2022

Time: 12:00 – 1:30 pm PST


What Will I Learn?

You will learn about Indigenous principles and perspectives of disability and belonging.


Continue Learning

“The time to make things happen is now. The time to seek out our individual and shared power is now.”

Learn more about REDI’s Indigenous Initiatives here

Discover more about REDI’s Indigenous Speakers Series here

Find REDI’s Indigenous-Specific Resources here

Recording: IBPOC Voices: A Conversation with Dr. Adrian Yee

Thank you for joining us on Friday, November 4th, 2022 from 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm (PST), for “IBPOC Voices: A Conversation with Dr. Adrian Yee”. Dr. Adrian Yee is the current Director of Curriculum, within the Undergraduate Medical Education (UGME) Program, UBC Faculty of Medicine (FoM), since 2018. He provides leadership for UGME to ensure a high-quality educational experience across all four sites and all four years of the curriculum.

This virtual event is part of the IBPOC Voices, a new monthly series led by Dr. Neila Miled the anti-racism Advisor.

IBPOC Voices is an opportunity to meet and have a conversation with guests who identify as Indigenous, Black and people of color. This series centers IBPOC experiences and knowledge, and highlights how they navigate the different challenges and how they engage with equity, diversity and inclusion. It is also a space where guests talk about their vision of an equitable and just environment. This series is an opportunity to open spaces where we know each other more and create a sense of community because “We are fully dependent on each other for the possibility of being understood and without this understanding we are not intelligible, we do not make sense, we are not solid, visible, integrated; we are lacking. So, travelling to each other’s “worlds” would enable us to be through loving each other” (Maria Lugones)

Dr. Adrian Yee is the current Director of Curriculum, within the Undergraduate Medical Education (UGME) Program, UBC Faculty of Medicine (FoM), since 2018. He provides leadership for UGME to ensure a high-quality educational experience across all four sites and all four years of the curriculum.

Dr. Yee completed his MD at the University of Toronto and his Internal Medicine/Clinical Hematology training at the University of Alberta. He is a practicing hematologist in Victoria. Previous educational leadership roles in the Faculty of Medicine have included Assistant Dean, Island Medical Program and Associate Director, Curriculum Years 3 and 4. He completed the Masters of Educational Technology at UBC in 2021. He is the recipient of a Professional Development Grant from the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons and the Principal Investigator of educational grants. to co-create curricula with patients and caregivers.


Moderator

  • Dr. Neila Miled – Anti-Racism Advisor

Topic: IBPOC Voices: A Conversation with Dr. Adrian Yee

Date: Friday, November 4th, 2022

Time: 12:00 – 1:00 pm PST


What Will I Learn?

You will learn more about IBPOC experiences and knowledge, and how IBPOC navigate the different challenges and engage with equity, diversity and inclusion.


It Starts With Us: ‘Rock the Boat’

Join us on Tuesday, October 25th for It Starts With Us: Rock the Boat.

Reimagining  Supervisory Relationships 

Continue reading “It Starts With Us: ‘Rock the Boat’”

Healthy Environments in Academic Research Teams (HEART)

One of the primary aims of our Strategic Plan is to create respectful and supportive learning and work environments for everyone here at UBC Faculty of Medicine.

This year, the Graduate and Postdoctoral Education office are developing an exciting new program called Healthy Environments in Academic Research Teams (HEART). HEART aims to equip you and your team with the knowledge and tools you need to create a genuinely healthy and inclusive research environment for everyone.

They want to hear your thoughts on what makes a healthy research environment in the Faculty of Medicine and, most importantly, how the HEART program can support lab teams to shape positive change without adding undue burden on already stretched capacity. They are running a series of focus groups for faculty, research staff and trainees throughout November.

It would be great to see as many people as possible involved in shaping such an important initiative.

For more information, please visit https://tinyurl.com/ubcheart

You can also contact Leigh Spanner, Coinvestigator & Key Study Contact atleigh.spanner@ubc.ca or Dr. Michael Hunt, Principal Investigator & Professor of Physical Therapy, Faculty of Medicine at michael.hunt@ubc.ca.

October 2022 Newsletter

Office of Respectful Environments, Equity, Diversity & Inclusion
Register for upcoming events and find the latest resources
Office of Respectful Environments, Equity, Diversity & Inclusion, Faculty of Medicine
October 2022 Newsletter | Office of Respectful Environments, Equity, Diversity & Inclusion
 

Welcome to our first newsletter

Since the Office of Respectful Environments, Equity, Diversity & Inclusion (REDI) was established by Dean Dermot Kelleher in 2020, the team has grown and expanded the services that we provide across the Faculty of Medicine, in support of the Faculty’s strategic plan goal to transform our culture through our working and learning environments.

As part of these efforts, we are excited to present this first edition of our newsletter, which will be sent monthly. The newsletter is another way to strengthen our connection to our community, raise awareness of events, and share information relevant to our ongoing efforts to support change.

Roslyn Goldner
Executive Director, Office of Respectful Environments, Equity, Diversity & Inclusion

 
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It Starts with Us: ‘Rock the Boat’: Reimagining Supervisory Relationships

Join us on Tuesday, October 25th from 12:00-1:30 PM for "It Starts With Us: Rock the Boat". This interactive session will demonstrate a resource using Research-based Theatre (RbT) that will illustrate the challenges that arise from the inherent power dynamics in supervisory relationships and will prompt dialogue about how to foster healthy and respectful supervisory relationships and improve wellbeing for all involved parties.

REGISTER
 
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IBPOC Voices: A Conversation with Dr. Adrian Yee

Join us virtually on Friday, November 4th, 2022 from 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm (PST), for “IBPOC Voices: A Conversation with Dr. Adrian Yee”. IBPOC Voices is a new monthly series led by Dr. Neila Miled the Anti-racism Advisor. It is an opportunity to meet and have a conversation with guests who identify as Indigenous, Black and people of color. In this session we will have a conversation with Dr. Adrian Yee, the Director of Curriculum, within the Undergraduate Medical Education (UGME) Program.

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Transformative Change According to Doug Kelly: Creating the BC First Nations Health Authority

Join us virtually on Wednesday, November 9th, from 12:00 pm – 1:30 pm, for “Transformative Change: Creating the BC First Nations Health Authority” with Grand Chief Doug Kelly – Cheam First Nation. In this third session of the Indigenous Speaker Series, we will learn about the work and leadership of GC Doug Kelly in the creation of the First Nations Health Authority, and his experiences and insights as the former Chair of the First Nations Health Council.

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Recording: Transformative Change According to Doug Kelly: Creating the BC First Nations Health Authority

Thank you for joining us on Wednesday, November 9th, 2022 from 12:00 pm – 1:30 pm (PST), for “Transformative Change: Creating the BC First Nations Health Authority” with Grand Chief Doug Kelly – Cheam First Nation. In this third session of the Indigenous Speaker Series, we learnt about the work and leadership of GC Doug Kelly in the creation of the First Nations Health Authority, and his experiences and insights as the former Chair of the First Nations Health Council. GC Kelly reflected on what we can learn about the self-determination of BC First Nations, what’s needed to strengthen the work in relation to Truth and Reconciliation, and how health and academic systems can better plan and respond to the unique needs of First Nations in BC.

Transformative Change According to Doug Kelly: Creating the BC First Nations Health Authority

Join us virtually on Wednesday, November 9th, 2022 from 12:00 pm – 1:30 pm (PST), for “Transformative Change According to Doug Kelly: Creating the BC First Nations Health Authority” This virtual event is presented by the Indigenous Speakers Series

Ts’i:m (Grand Chief Doug Kelly) – Cheam First Nation, Former President & Tribal Chief for Health – Stó:lō Tribal Council, Former Chair – First Nations Health Council, Former Member of the Political Executive – First Nations Summit (Bio)

Ts’i:m is a grandfather to six healthy, beautiful, and intelligent granddaughters and two handsome and bright grandsons. Married to Sherry for twenty-six years – together they raised a blended family of five daughters and one son. Doug and Sherry reside on the Soowahlie reserve in Chilliwack, B.C.
In December 2020, Doug retired from elected politics after serving twenty years as an elected Tribal Chief for the Stólō Tribal Council. For 12-years, Doug Kelly served the STC as President. After 12.5 years, in December 2020, he also stepped down from the BC First Nations Health Council. Doug Kelly served the FNHC as the Chair from June 2010 to July 2019. In 2010 and 2011, he led the tripartite negotiations that resulted in the creation of the First Nations Health Authority. The FNHC is responsible for overseeing the new First Nations health governance structure and the implementation of the Tripartite First Nations Health Plan.
Grand Chief Doug Kelly has also served as Soowahlie Chief for eight years. He also served on the First Nations Summit Political Executive for four years. He served as the founding Chair of the BC First Nations Fisheries Council for two years. Doug was a founding member of the BC Treaty Commission for one year.
Mr. Kelly has 13 years of experience in senior management positions, including senior leadership roles with the First Nations Chiefs’ Health Committee, Stó:lō Nation, and Stó:lō Tribal Council. Doug also led the development of Stó:lō Health, Child Welfare, and other programs including fisheries and economic development.

Moderator

  • Derek K Thompson – Thlaapkiituup, Indigenous Advisor

Description 

The creation of the First Nations Health Authority in October 2013 marked an historic period for BC First Nations. This important milestone meant that First Nations in BC took another bold step forward towards self-determination, and away from the control of the Department of Indian Affairs. First Nations could develop and administer health services in their communities based on their own unique needs and cultural understandings, and not be dictated to by an outdated paternalistic system. The pillars of our own independence, our own teachings, our own ingenuity, and our own vision replaced our codependency on a system that was founded on racism, oppression, assimilation, and indifference. We could truly move forward in a deliberate effort to bring about transformative change in the health status of our people and communities.


The four pillars of this transformative shift include the First Nations Health Authority, the First Nations Health Council, the First Nations Health Directors Association, and the Tripartite Committee on First Nations Health. Each pillar is designed to change and improve the way BC First Nations administer, govern, acquire, and support the health programs and services in their communities. The First Nations Health Authority has established itself as an important and necessary advocate to improve healthcare systems and services for BC First Nations.


The journey to arrive at this momentous paradigm shift was no easy feat. The work to build consensus amongst 203 BC First Nations was difficult and ever-changing, and the effort to negotiate an agreement with federal and provincial counterparts was often met with rigid mandates and unrealistic expectations. It takes a certain measure of shrewdness, an intensity of poise, and a confidence of unwavering and unapologetic leadership to navigate these political arenas, and Grand Chief Doug Kelly was exactly the trailblazer we needed.


This important and timely conversation will focus on the work and leadership of GC Doug Kelly in the creation of the First Nations Health Authority, and highlight his experiences and insights as the former Chair of the First Nations Health Council. GC Kelly will reflect on what we can learn about the self-determination of BC First Nations, what’s needed to strengthen the work in relation to Truth and Reconciliation, and how health and academic systems can better plan and respond to the unique needs of First Nations in BC.


Topic: Transformative Change According to Doug Kelly: Creating the BC First Nations Health Authority

Date: Wednesday, November 9th, 2022

Time: 12:00 – 1:30 pm PST


What Will I Learn?

You will learn about the unique perspectives of First Nations leadership in the development of the BC First Nations Health Authority.


Continue Learning

“The time to make things happen is now. The time to seek out our individual and shared power is now.”

Learn more about REDI’s Indigenous Initiatives here

Discover more about REDI’s Indigenous Initiatives Speakers Series here

Find REDI’s Indigenous-Specific Resources here

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